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Scars: gone with the foam

16/08/2019

Poorly healing wounds and severe scarring are more than just a cosmetic problem; they can significantly impair a person's mobility and health. Empa researchers have now developed a foam that is supposed to prevent excessive scarring and help wounds to heal quickly. An essential ingredient: the yellow ginger tumeric.
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KIST develops technology for creating flexible sensors on topographic surfaces

09/08/2019

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, president: Byung-gwon Lee) announced that Dr. Hyunjung Yi of the Post-Silicon Semiconductor Institute and her research team developed a transfer-printing technology that uses hydrogel and nano ink to easily create high-performance sensors on flexible substrates of diverse shapes and structures.
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Oddball edge wins nanotube faceoff

09/08/2019

A two-faced interface between growing carbon nanotubes and solid catalysts turns out to be more common than once believed, according to a theory developed at Rice University. Understanding of the mechanism could help scientists working to develop homogenous nanotube growth for applications.
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3D printed rocket fuel comparison at James Cook University

09/08/2019

James Cook University scientists in Australia are using 3D printing to create fuels for rockets, and using tailor-made rocket motors they've built to test the fuels.
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Engineers use heat-free tech for flexible electronics; print metal on flowers, gelatin

09/08/2019

Researchers led by Iowa State's Martin Thuo are using liquid-metal particles to print electronic lines and traces on rose petals, leaves, paper, gelatin -- on all kinds of materials. The technology creates flexible electronics that could have many applications such as monitoring crops, tracking a building's structural integrity or collecting biological data.
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A good first step toward nontoxic solar cells

08/08/2019

A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has found what they believe is a more stable, less toxic semiconductor for solar applications, using a novel double mineral discovered through data analytics and quantum-mechanical calculations.
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Self healing robots that "feel pain"

08/08/2019

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel ...
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Yellow is not the new black: Discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells

07/08/2019

A study led by KU Leuven for the first time explains how a promising type of perovskites - man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity - can be stabilized. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient. The study was published in Science.
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Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers

07/08/2019

As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity-- a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies. ...
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Does one size does fit all? A new model for organic semiconductors

06/08/2019

A team including researchers from Osaka University has used a single rubrene crystal to investigate the room temperature behavior of organic single crystals, and in so doing have dispelled previously-held assumptions based on inorganic semiconductor behavior. It is hoped that these insights into the specific behavior of organic ...
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