Science

Overview: Science

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Deformation of nanotubes to control conductivity

22/10/2018

Scientists from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Inorganic Nanomaterials together with their international colleagues have proved it possible to change the structural and conductive properties of nanotubes by stretching them. This can potentially expand nanotubes' application into electronics and high-precision sensors such as microprocessors and high-precision detectors.
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Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals

19/10/2018

Corrosion of metals is an age-old problem, but they are normally protected from catastrophic damage by naturally forming, super-thin oxide films. Traditionally, these protective films have been viewed as simple oxides of well-anticipated compounds, but new work led by Northwestern University reveals new insights. ...
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Flexible piezoelectric acoustic sensors for speaker recognition

19/10/2018

Researcher have developed a machine learning-based acoustic sensor for speaker recognition. The team fabricated a flexible piezoelectric membrane by mimicking the basilar membrane in the human cochlear. Resonant frequencies vibrate corresponding regions of the trapezoidal piezoelectric membrane, which converts voice to electrical signal with a highly sensitive self-powered acoustic sensor.
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A RUDN chemist created nanoreactors to synthesize organic substances under visible light

18/10/2018

A RUDN chemist developed a new type of photocatalysts –nanostructures from titanium dioxide. Hollow nanocubes with ultra-thin walls act like nanoreactors and provide a 28-fold enhancement in promoting organic reactions at room temperature under the influence of visible light. The article about the development was published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.
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New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

18/10/2018

Recipes for three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, of parts have required as much guesswork as science. Until now. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique -- sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR) ...
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Electrons go with the flow

17/10/2018

You turn on a switch and the light switches on because electricity 'flows'. The usual perception is that this is like opening a faucet and the water starts to flow. But this analogy is misleading. The flow of water is determined by the theory of hydrodynamics, where the behavior of the fluid requires no knowledge of the movements of individual molecules.
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Supercomputer predicts optical properties of complex hybrid materials

17/10/2018

Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. These types of so-called layered 'hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites' – or HOIPs – are popular targets for light-based devices ...
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Simple fabrication of full-color perovskite LEDs

16/10/2018

An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) introduced a simple technique to fabricate full-color perovskite LEDs.
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Approach paves way for new antimicrobial materials

16/10/2018

Researchers have successfully incorporated 'photosensitizers' into a range of polymers, giving those materials the ability to render bacteria and viruses inactive using only ambient oxygen and visible-wavelength light.
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Perovskites – materials of the future in optical communication

15/10/2018

Researchers at the universities in Linköping and Shenzhen have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music. "It's a promising material for future rapid optical communication", says Feng Gao, researcher at Linköping University.
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