Science

Someone once said: today’s technology is tomorrow’s bread and today’s science is tomorrow’s technology. With this in mind, taking a look at the bigger picture – at what the research & development community has to offer – can be inspiring and eye-opening, particularly where an industry like plastics and rubber is concerned in which technology has such high priority.

Overview: Science

Page of 10

Scientists create a nano-trampoline to probe quantum behavior

23/02/2017

For the first time, scientists have measured quantum criticality by developing a thin membrane suspended in air by very narrow bridges, thereby forming a 'nano-trampoline'. This enabled specific heat measurements of thin films through a quantum phase transition from a superconducting state to an electrically insulating state close to absolute zero temperature, and is ...
Read more

Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential

23/02/2017

Northwestern University engineers discover that an organic material self-assembles directly next to borophene, forming an ideal interface for electronic applications.
Read more

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

22/02/2017

For the first time, a single multifunction flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair, developed by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical and chemical signals back and forth into the brain.
Read more

Improved polymer and new assembly method for ultra-conformable 'electronic tattoo' devices

21/02/2017

A group of researchers at Waseda University has developed processes and materials for ultrathin stick-on electronic devices using elastomeric "nanosheet" film, achieving ease of production while also preserving high elasticity and flexibility fifty times better than previously reported polymer nano sheets. This research is published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry C online edition.
Read more

Scientists decipher the nanoscale architecture of a beetle's shell

21/02/2017

Ruiguo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and his colleagues found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure of a beetle's lightweight but durable shell.
Read more

Scientists discover how essential methane catalyst is made

20/02/2017

New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in global warming. However, because the bacteria that can convert CO2 into methane, ...
Read more

'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices

17/02/2017

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a material that could reduce signal losses in photonic devices. The advance has the potential to boost the efficiency of various light-based technologies including fiber optic communication systems, lasers and photovoltaics.
Read more

Fluorescence dyes from the pressure cooker

16/02/2017

Perylene bisimides are a heavily investigated and sought after class of organic pigments, since they show interesting dye properties. While these compounds are red pigments in the solid state, when dissolved, they generate bright yellowish-green solutions under UV irradiation. Aside their optical appeal; organic molecules that appear colored in daylight often also show ...
Read more

A nanofiber matrix for healing

15/02/2017

A new nanofiber-on-microfiber matrix could help produce more and better quality stem cells for disease treatment and regenerative therapies.
Read more

Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds

15/02/2017

For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect. Any deviation from perfection will adversely affect the quantum behavior of the material. Highly perfect nanodiamonds are also quite expensive and difficult to make. A cheaper alternative, say researchers, is to take defect-ridden, ...
Read more
Page of 10