Science

Someone once said: today’s technology is tomorrow’s bread and today’s science is tomorrow’s technology. With this in mind, taking a look at the bigger picture – at what the research & development community has to offer – can be inspiring and eye-opening, particularly where an industry like plastics and rubber is concerned in which technology has such high priority.

Overview: Science

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Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technology

14/07/2017

When it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice – even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization – the way that ...
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New material resembling a metal nanosponge could reduce computer energy consumption

14/07/2017

Researchers from the UAB, in collaboration with the ICN2, have developed a nanoporous material based on a copper and nickel alloy, with a structure similar to that of a sponge with pores measuring the size of a millionth of a millimeter, which allows handling and storing information using very little energy. These nanosp...
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Green method developed for making artificial spider silk

14/07/2017

Researchers have designed a super stretchy, strong and sustainable material that mimics the qualities of spider silk, and is 'spun' from a material that is 98 percent water.
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Study suggests route to improving rechargeable lithium batteries

14/07/2017

In a study that suggests a route to improving rechargeable lithium batteries, MIT researchers report that smooth surfaces may prevent harmful deposits from working their way into a solid electrolyte.
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Soft and stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable robots

13/07/2017

Wearable technologies are exploding in popularity, but most of the electronic sensors that detect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer's natural movements and the accuracy of the data collected. Now, a team of researchers at the Wyss Institute and SEAS at Harvard University has created a highly sensitive soft sensor ...
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Researchers use a synthetic 'tongue' to sort out whiskies

13/07/2017

Whiskies may differ in taste and smell, but they are so similar in chemical composition that most analyses can't tell two closely related brews apart. In the journal Chem on June 8, researchers introduce an artificial sensor array or 'tongue' that can detect whether two nearly identical whisky samples are a match. The sensor arrays can also identify some of the whiskies' key qualities, ...
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Thinking thin brings new layering and thermal abilities to the semiconductor industry

13/07/2017

The concept of a simple technique to remove thin layers from otherwise thick, rigid semiconductor crystals has been actively explored for years. In a significant advance, a research group from IBM successfully applied their new 'controlled spalling' layer transfer technique to gallium nitride (GaN) crystals, a prevalent semiconductor material, and created a pathway for producing many layers ...
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Discovery could lead to sustainable ethanol made from carbon dioxide

12/07/2017

A recent discovery by Stanford University scientists could lead to a new, more sustainable way to make ethanol without corn or other crops. This promising technology has three basic components: water, carbon dioxide and electricity delivered through a copper catalyst.
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Shaking Schroedinger's cat

12/07/2017

Frequent measurement of a quantum system's state can either speed or delay its collapse, effects called the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effect. But so too can 'quasimeasurements' that only poke the system and garner no information about its state.
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New approach improves ability to predict metals' reactions with water

12/07/2017

The wide reach of corrosion, a multitrillion-dollar global problem, may someday be narrowed considerably thanks to a new, better approach to predict how metals react with water.
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