06/19/2012

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Saip high pressure machines, stronger than the Baltic Sea challenges

Three high-pressure Saip machines were continuously used for two years in the Baltic Sea to ensure - under extremely challenging operational and environmental conditions - the perfect sealing of the 12.2 m steel line pipes of the Nord Stream gas pipeline that will connect Russia to Germany through a 1,224 km pipe under the Baltic Sea. At the conclusion of its activity for the Line 2 part of the Nord Stream Project, the Saip customer has sent its machines to Saip for regular maintenance, to get the equipment ready for the next challenges around the world.[image_0] "Saip machines are designed and built for the success of our customers and of the projects they work in,” commented Roland Rast, Technical Director at Saip Equipment. "Our Technical Department understands our customers' needs and translates them into unique specifics that make our equipment different and tailored to its destination of use. When a machine is going to face a different environment, or a completely new operational context, we are able to re-configure it as needed, while with regular maintenance every piece remains perfectly efficient,” Rast added. "We know that our clients choose Saip for our reputation of quality, and we work to make sure that our machines testify of our technical capabilities, of our commitment to the success of our clients, of our ability to provide solutions that are exactly what our customers and their projects need,” said Luigi Procopio, Commercial Director at Saip. "Our customers remain loyal to our quality and to our commitment to them; they know we do not just offer what we have in catalogue, but we strive to always give them competitive advantage through unique solutions and equipment,” Procopio added. According to Saip, the company has provided in its over 30 years of business tens of high-pressure equipment like the ones used in the Nord Stream project.The Nord Stream natural gas pipelines stretch across the Baltic Sea from Portovaya Bay near the town of Vyborg, Russia, to the coast at Lubmin near Greifswald, Germany. The pipeline is 1,224 kilometres long and consists of two parallel lines with a transport capacity of 27.5 bcm a year each. The first of the twin pipelines became operational in November 2011. Pipe laying operations for Line 2 have been completed well ahead of schedule in April 2012. When fully operational in late 2012, Nord Stream's twin pipelines will have the capacity to transport 55 bcm of Russian gas a year to the EU. Each line consists of approximately 100,000 24-tonne concrete weight coated steel pipes laid on the seabed. Nord Stream was able to design the pipeline to operate without an intermediate compressor station. Gas will travel the full 1,224 kilometre distance thanks to the 220 bar pressure generated by the Portovaya compressor station which is operated by Gazprom near the pipeline's starting point. The pipelines have a constant internal diameter of 1,153 millimetres.

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