03/07/2012

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NPE2012: New inductees for the Plastics Hall of Fame announced

The ten new inductees are Thomas E. Brady,Lawrence J. Broutman,Jay L. Gardiner,Jobst U. Gellert,H. Gunther Hoyt,Robert P. Kittredge,H. Richard Landis,Robert A. Malloy,Daniel W. McGuire, Jr.,Timothy W. Womer. The Plastics Hall of Fame was founded in 1972 to honor individuals whose extraordinary accomplishments contributed to the growth of the plastics industry. The Plastics Hall of Fame is administered by The Plastics Academy. New living inductees are elected every three years by a majority vote of the living members of the Hall of Fame and are honored at the triennial NPE. Between NPEs, posthumous inductees are honored. Thus far 153 individuals have been inducted. In the following you find the biographical sketches of 2012 Plastics Hall of Fame inductees that have compiled by the Plastics Academy.Thomas E. BradyA pioneer of today's PET industry, Thomas E. Brady, PhD began his career by doing fundamental research on polymer orientation, work that led to the entry of Owens-Illinois, Inc. into the manufacture of PET soft drink containers. He founded Plastic Technologies, Inc. (PTI), a leader in stretch blow molding of PET packaging, and is that company's CEO and president. He also founded six other packaging-related companies, including Phoenix Technologies International, LLC, the world's largest recycler of PET. He holds six patents on PET and packaging technologies.[image_0] In 1972, after earning bachelors and master degree in engineering at Dartmouth College, Dr. Brady received his PhD from the University of Michigan. His doctoral thesis, Structure and Deformation of Glassy Amorphous Polymers, was a harbinger of things to come. He joined Owens-Illinois in 1972, ultimately becoming vice president and director of R&D for O-I's Plastics Group. He began his 13 years at O-I with research on optimizing polymer performance through orientation. This paved the way for commercialization of PET carbonated soft drink bottles. Other achievements of the team led by Dr. Brady included the first use of short-wave infrared reheat systems for blow molding machines; the commercialization of rotary continuous-motion blow molding systems; and the evolution of injection molding cavitation from 8 to 72 cavities. In later years the team pioneered the commercialization of in-mold labeling, spill-back spouted containers, and secondary "carrier” packaging. In 1986, Dr. Brady founded PTI as an R&D company assisting brand owners, with the Coca-Cola Company as its first client. PTI partnered with Coca-Cola in the commercialization of the company's first contour bottle, creating the preform and blow molds and expanding the cavitation on both to make PET competitive with glass. Lightweighting eventually reduced the 2-liter bottle from 57 to 44 grams and the 20-ounce bottle from 31 to 24 grams.Dr. Brady was instrumental in demonstrating that a PET soft drink container did not require straight sidewalls. His company revolutionized the industry by showing brand owners how to make a shaped or contoured container. Working with Graham Packaging, PTI also took part in the development of hot-fill packaging. It assisted Graham Packaging in developing the Tropicana Twister bottle, featuring innovative shapes and curves to enhance marketing appeal. Lawrence J. BroutmanA prolific researcher, Lawrence J. Broutman, ScD has developed techniques for the analysis and characterization of polymer materials that have spurred much further research and generated innovation in many sectors of the industry. He has been unusual in having developed expertise in both un-reinforced and fiber-reinforced plastics. He has written nearly 170 technical publications, been the co-author of two textbooks on polymer composites, edited nine reference books, been awarded four patents, and received five best paper honors from the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE). He is currently a research professor in the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology and a consultant to Bodycote Broutman Laboratories.[image_1_right] Dr. Broutman began his research career as an undergraduate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1959, carrying out a damage study of a fiber reinforced laminate subjected to thermal cyclic fatigue. His first publication in 1962 was based on his masters thesis at MIT. He received his ScD degree from MIT in 1963. In the 1960s and 1970s, Dr. Broutman's researches pioneered the study of the interface strength between a fiber and a polymer matrix. Ultimately this work included boron and carbon fibers as well as glass. It led to development of new interface treatments. Dr. Broutman also pioneered in the use of scanning electron microscopy to examine the structure and failure modes of glass fiber reinforced plastics. His research led to development of improved processing methods and resins. His studies focusing on the fracture toughness of various glossy polymers and its relationship to polymer structure generated characterization methods that made possible the development of new polymers. His research on the cyclic fatigue behavior of fiber-reinforced plastics enabled design engineers to better account for cumulative damage. Dr. Broutman was one of the first researchers to use instrumented impact methods to evaluate energy absorption during impact. He designed and built a falling weight instrumented impact machine to evaluate the impact characteristics of glass and graphite laminates. This work made it possible to design composites so that they provide maximum energy absorption. Becoming interested in the application of metal-working techniques to plastics and composites, Dr. Broutman pioneered in the application of cold-rolling, deep drawing, and forging to thermoplastics and thermoplastic laminates. He developed new methods to measure residual stresses in plastic parts, demonstrating how such stresses affect the properties of plastics such as polycarbonate. He has also studied the effect of brittle surfaces on plastics properties and developed a mechanics theory to predict the criteria for surface embrittlement. Other research by him made contributions in such diverse applications as medical devices, football helmets, and underground tanks. Jay L. GardinerA tireless volunteer for plastics causes, Jay L. Gardiner has been continuously active in service to the industry for more than two decades and has held leadership positions or board memberships with a number of organizations. All this has taken place alongside Mr. Gardiner's full-time work in the field of resin sales. He is the owner of Gardiner Plastics, Inc.[image_2] Mr. Gardiner holds a bachelors degree in psychology from Queens College, New York City, and an MBA from the Stern School of Graduate Business Administration at New York University. Jay Gardiner entered the plastics industry in 1973, joining Warbern Packaging, a multi-plant injection molder that eventually became A&E Plastics. He rose to the position of vice president of marketing. In 1983 he became product manager of styrenic resins for Bamberger Polymers and then was named business manager of its Private Label Division. From 1986 to 1992 he served resin distributor Marsh Plastics as vice president. There he developed a consultative approach to sales, providing resin purchasing assistance for small processors that did not have purchasing or materials management departments. Mr. Gardiner founded Gardiner Plastics, Inc. in 1992. The company combines resin distribution and management consulting for small processors and has been involved in turnaround management, consolidation strategies, and advising on mergers and acquisition. A longtime member of SPE, Mr. Gardiner was chairman of SPE Antec in 1989, was later appointed to the executive committee of the Society, and in 1996 was elected president. During his tenure on the executive committee, he was the principal author of the 2000 SPE Strategic Plan and formed or improved relationships with other industry organizations. Starting in the early 1990s, Jay Gardiner has served on the board of directors and executive committee of the National Plastics Center and Museum. More recently, he worked with Syracuse University and the Plastics Pioneers Association to effect the transfer of the Museum collection from Leominster, MA, to the university. Since 1998, he has served as president of the Plastics Academy, which administers the Plastics Hall of Fame. He has also been on the board of directors of the Plastics Institute of America, which provides a conduit between academic institutions and industry, and he has served as its chairman. He has been a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association since 2003. For SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Associations, Mr. Gardiner has worked on strategic planning projects since 2006. As an advocate for the plastics industry, Jay Gardiner has published many articles in industry journals and served as host, moderator, or speaker at conferences worldwide. In 1995, he was instrumental in bringing about the repeal of one of the first plastic bag bans, in Suffolk County, NY, where he lives and works. Jobst U. GellertJobst U. Gellert is one of the most prolific inventors in Canadian history, having been awarded 825 patents worldwide, 199 of them in the U.S. He is credited for patenting the first commercially viable hot runner system in 1965. With his wife Waltraud, he has built Mold-Masters Limited, a leading worldwide supplier of hot runner systems. Although a debilitating stroke forced him to retire as CEO of the company in 1999, Mr. Gellert continues to be a creative inspiration to the company.[image_3_right] His involvement with injection molding and moldmaking began in his native Germany. He received accreditation as a Master Mold-Maker there in 1956 and emigrated to Canada two years later. He and Mrs. Gellert founded Mold-Masters in 1963. While hot runners had begun to appear in the early 1960s, they could not be used with a number of resins without burning, splaying, stringing, or other defects. In 1965, Mr. Gellert filed for a patent on technology that addressed this problem by providing for cast-in beryllium-copper heating elements positioned outside the melt channel. Mr. Gellert also invented technologies for melt distribution manifolds, hot runner nozzles, actuation methods, and mold designs that solved many of the issues that plagued the first hot runner systems. This led to hot runner molding being adopted globally. Today Mold-Masters has seven manufacturing locations and 23 service locations worldwide, sells in 78 countries, and employs more than 1,300 people. H. Gunther HoytH. Gunther Hoyt has played important roles in the internationalization of the plastics industry and in the progress of SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association. In addition, he has been a technological leader in the field of machine components. His contributions to SPI's NPE exposition extend beyond his chairmanship of the 2003 show.[image_4] Born in Germany, Gunther Hoyt came to the U.S. in 1959 and grew up in Newburgh, New York. He holds an undergraduate degree from Rutgers University and has taught there and at New York University. His association with screw and barrel manufacturer Xaloy Inc. extended from 1977 to 2009, by which time he was executive vice president. During this period Xaloy grew from a one-factory company focused on the U.S. market to a global supplier of plastification systems to the world's leading machinery OEMs. Mr. Hoyt spearheaded the establishment of distribution networks and direct sales operations in North America, Europe, China, Japan, and other Asian countries. He also played key roles in setting up sales and service operations in Japan and manufacturing and customer service facilities in Thailand. While at Xaloy, Mr. Hoyt participated in the development and successful introduction of the first tungsten carbide-based bimetallic barrel alloy, now the industry standard; micro-alloy backing steels for bimetallic cylinders, making possible increased processing pressures; and tungsten carbide-coated twin-screw barrel and screw sets, now the standard system for processing lead-free PVC. Mr. Hoyt left Xaloy to form Gunther Hoyt Associates, an international business consultancy specializing in plastics equipment and machine components. Currently his company leads the exhibit sales program for the NPE2012 plastics exposition in Europe, Japan, and Korea. In 1985, Gunther Hoyt was a leader in establishing the Components Division of SPI, a development which brought more than 50 new member companies into the organization. When the Divisions subsequently merged with SPI's Machinery Division, Mr. Hoyt served as chairman. He led in the creation of the market statistics section for machine components, which has been cited as an outstanding leading indicator for machinery sales in North America. His involvement with SPI trade shows has been extensive. He was chairman of the Plastics USA show in 1998, chaired the Operations Committee for NPE2000, and served as chairman of the NPE2003 exposition. When the Great Recession caused many major Japanese machinery OEMs to cancel participation in NPE2009, Mr. Hoyt organized and led a delegation of SPI officials, including president William Carteaux, to visit these companies in Japan. As a result, every one of the OEMs that were visited decided to exhibit in the show. Robert P. KittredgeAn entrepreneur and philanthropist, Robert P. Kittredge founded Fabri-Kal Corp. in 1950. It is now the eighth-largest thermoformer in North America, serving the food service and consumer goods packaging market. In 1969, Mr. Kittredge established the Fabri-Kal Foundation for charitable giving. Over the years it has provided millions of dollars in scholarships and community grants.[image_5_right] Robert Kittredge entered the plastics industry in 1948. Two years later he founded Fabri-Kal. The original facility was an A&P grocery store in Kalamazoo, MI. Today the company has annual sales of USD300-million, employs 900 people, and operates four manufacturing plants with 40 major production lines and 14 printers. Fabri-Kal is still privately held. The Fabri-Kal Foundation, an independent, nonprofit organization, was established to further the cultural diversity of the locations in which Fabri-Kal operates and, since 1994, the granting of higher-education assistance to the children of Fabri-Kal employees. It has donated USD7.3 million to these cultural and educational causes. Young adult children of every Fabri-Kal employee are offered generous higher-education tuition assistance, and to date over 150 children have received $4.6 million collectively. The other USD2.7 million has benefited the communities in which Fabri-Kal employees live and work. Mr. Kittredge's company has been a member of SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Associations for 55 years. He himself has served the association in leadership positions, including board chairmanship. H. Richard LandisAn inventor and entrepreneur, Richard Landis has been a pioneer in thin-wall injection molding. His company, Landis Plastics, grew from a one-machine operation in 1956 to an enterprise with six U.S. locations employing more than 2,100 people. He has been awarded 16 patents in the design of plastic parts, among them the tamper-evident tear strip for five-gallon containers and the lids for stackable dairy containers. He held leadership positions in SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association, and in 1988 he participated in SPI's development of the resin identification code for the well-known "chasing-arrow” recycling symbol.[image_6] Richard Landis founded Landis Plastics in 1954. Among his innovations in the 1950s and 1960s were marbleized tile, coffee can lids, diary tubs (the Cool Whip bowl, still in production). In the 1980s, Mr. Landis worked with Husky Manufacturing on the development of Husky's first high-speed injection molding machines, which became an industry standard for production of thin-wall containers. Landis plastics was one of the first molders to build stack molds in 1966, developed one of the first 32-cavity molds in 1980, and was one of the first to print non-round containers in 1999. Landis Plastics was still family-owned when Mr. Landis retired as chairman and CEO in 2003. At the time, the company held a 51% share of the North American market for yogurt containers, 52% of the market for sour cream and cottage cheese containers, and the leading position in the margarine tub business. The company was a charter member of the Rigid Packaging Container Division of SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association. Richard Landis later served as chairman of the division. He was on SPI's National Board of Directors from 1987 to 1990 and was recognized by SPI for outstanding service. Robert A. Malloy, PhDAn educator, researcher, and author, Dr. Robert A. Malloy currently chairs one of the leading U.S. plastics engineering departments and in his career has trained many professional engineers who have gone on to make an impact in the plastics industry. He himself holds 14 U.S. and two European patents. He has been the principle or co-principle investigator for more than 70 funded research projects or grants. He has authored or co-authored more than 60 conference and journal papers in the field of plastics engineering.[image_7_right] Dr. Malloy received his bachelors degree in plastics engineering from the University of Lowell in Massachusetts in 1979 and his doctorate in polymer science from that university in 1987. He joined the University of Lowell in 1988 and since 2002 has been chairman of the Department of Plastics Engineering. Since joining the faculty, Dr. Malloy has served as the thesis advisor for more than 90 students in masters or doctoral programs in plastics, manufacturing, or biomedical engineering. Under his leadership, the plastics engineering program at the university has prospered. Among many professional activities, Dr. Malloy has been active in the Society of Plastics Engineers and a presenter in its conferences. He was the founding editor of SPE's Journal of Injection Molding Technology. Working with co-inductee Jay Gardiner and SPI president William Carteaux, Dr. Malloy has worked to find a permanent home for the Plastics Hall of Fame following the closing of the National Plastics Center and Museum in 2010. He has invested personal time and money to help establish the new Hall of Fame headquarters at the University of Lowell campus. He has also supervised a student project to digitize past records, making possible a virtual exhibit available in multiple locations. Daniel W. McGuire, Jr.Dubbed by some in the plastics industry as "the father of resin distribution,” Daniel McGuire founded the first plastics resin distributor in North America. His vision was to create an organization that could fill in the gap between resin producers and small or medium-size processors. This became the mission of Mr. Maguire's company, General Polymers, and of subsequent competitors. In a 40-year plastics career, Daniel McGuire also played a leading role in the industry's trade and professional associations and was consistently an enthusiastic supporter.[image_8] Before starting General Polymers, Daniel McGuire spent five years as vice president and general manager of Thermofil Inc. He founded General Polymers in 1973, starting out with three employees and a 1,200 sq.ft. warehouse. By the time of his retirement in 1999, the company was shipping more than two billion pounds of resin per year from 26 suppliers and operating 22 regional warehouses with 400 employees. He implemented a year-long training program for his employees, called "The Principles of Resin Distribution.” One of his innovations as an employer was to cultivate opportunities for women in marketing positions. Today, plastics resin distribution is a USD13-billion business. Following a fire that totally destroyed the production facility of Chroma Corporation, Mr. McGuire developed a plan to warehouse all of the company's pigments, additives, and resins, enabling Chroma to survive and grow while operating in a competitor's plant. Strongly committed to the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE), Mr. Maguire required all of his sales people and their managers to become members of their local SPE sections, and at one point six of his employees served as section presidents simultaneously. Together with three members of the Plastics Hall of Fame, Daniel McGuire convinced Ferris State University to establish a plastics curriculum. This highly successful four-year program is now the largest in the United States. Timothy W. WomerA widely recognized authority on plasticizing screws for extrusion, injection molding, and blow molding, Timothy Womer has designed thousands of these components in a 38-year industry career. He holds 15 patents involving various aspects of polymer processing technology. He is a prolific author and lecturer, with many papers on injection molding, extrusion, heat transfer rolls, and component design. He has been extensively involved with industry associations, has held a number of leadership positions, and has received prestigious honors.[image_9_right] Mr. Womer entered the plastics industry in 1974 as a machinist at New Castle Industries Inc. He returned to college in 1978 to complete work for his degree in mechanical engineering at Youngstown State University. He held leadership positions in engineering and R&D with Spirex Corp., Conair, Inc., and NRM Corp. before joining Xaloy, LLC in 2003. He left that company as global technical advisor and started his current consultancy business, TWWomer & Assoc. As an extensively active member of the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE), Tim Womer served as president for the 2006-2007 term, chairman of the Extrusion Division, and technical program chairman. As a Certified Plastics Technologist, he has served as judge on SPE's certification program. He has received SPE's Fellow of the Society Award, Distinguished Service Award, Honor Service Award, and Bruce Maddock Award. From 1995 to 2005, Mr. Womer served on the Executive Committee for the NPE and Plastics USA trade shows produced by SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association. He has also been a liaison between SPI and SPE in the area of conferencing. Currently he is on the Education Committee for NPE2012.

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